Teenagers, Child Custody and Extracurricular Activities…what is the fight over?

Children who participate in physical activities such as sports experience positive health benefits, including decreased likelihood of obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes and some types of cancer (Council of Physical fitness and sports).  According to several articles, including the article published by the University of Florida, children who participate in sports are less likely to engage in drugs and alcohol than children who do not participate in sports.  Teenage girls are less likely to engage in risky sexual behaviors and become pregnant than girls who do not participate in sports.

Chilren who participate in sports also experience positive effects on their moods, mental health and self-esteem.  Children participating in sports overall have higher self-esteem and confidence than those not participating in sports.  Additionally, children partipating in sports develop better social skills, develop friendships, manage conflict, follw rules and overall receive higher grades that those that do not participate in sports.  Overall, organized sports have more positives than negatives and children should be encouraged to play sports.  Children who play sports statistially grow up into successful adults (American Academy of child and adolescent psychiatry: children and sports).

With all the above information readily available and published, WHY do parents who are not together BATTLE in court around their children playing sports?

Simple…these parents are most likely thinking about ‘their time’ rather than the ‘child’s time’.  Parents who will not allow or will not bring their child to practices and/or games may say “I don’t get enough time, therefore my time is more important” or “I live too far away and this cuts into of my time,” etc.  However, when the parents were together (presuming they were), they may have agreed to this sport or extra curricular activity for their child(ren) and since they are no longer together, they disagree on extra curricular activities (amongst many other issues). The question is ‘what about the child(ren)?’ and their desires?  Statistics have proven children who come from divorce/single parents have a higher risk of suicide, early sexual exploration, drugs/alcohol misuse, pregnancy, delinquency, poor grades, etc.  Although parents may know this information, they continue to deny or withhold their child(ren) playing sports.  These parents are usually the ones with less time with their child(ren) and/or live more than thirty minutes away from the other parent who may have more residential time.  However, there are parents who live nearby and still refuse their child to be involved in extra curricular activities.  Why?

Legal analysts and psychologists have studied these high conflict families and their unwillingness to see what is best for their children because these parents are wrapped up in their own emotional world rather than think about what is best for their children. (This article does not pertain to the parents who signs their child(ren) up for two plus sports during the same season and overloads their schedules (that is another issue for another day)). When emotions drive the decisions, this can be disastrous especially provided when children are involved. Some parents ask, “why does my child/teen deny seeing me or not want to see me?” Or blame the other parent who may have signed their child(ren) up for the sport the child has been playing for years or possibly a new sport because this ‘cuts into their parenting time’.

Let’s be realistic and begin thinking logically about what is best for your children and ensure a healthy, well-rounded upbringing rather than counting days, hours and minutes. At the end of the day, parents have 18 short years to raise their child(ren) into responsible, secure, healthy adults. Having their children involved in a sport and other extra curricular activities is extremely beneficial for their children’s overall well-being listed above and may negate the disadvantages of divorce and/or single parenting. Whether you and the other parent are involved in high conflict custody litigation or have minor disputes, try to put your feelings aside and do what is right for your children. If your child wants to play sports and is having fun and prospering, why not enjoy watching them rather than fight with the other parent?

Written by Rochelle Long, MA, LMHC

References:

American Academy of Pediatrics

https://www.muhealth.org/conditions-treatments/pediatrics/adolescent-medicine/benefits-of-sports

https://novakdjokovicfoundation.org/5-benefits-sports-kids/

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/co-parenting-after-divorce/201706/understanding-children-s-best-interests-in-divorce

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/surviving-your-childs-adolescence/201112/the-impact-divorce-young-children-and-adolescents

National Alliance for Youth Sports

National SAFE KIDS Campaign American Sports Education Program (ASEP)

president’s council of physical fitness

Is Internet Pornography Ruining Marriages-The Silent Killer!

Internet pornography is a real issue for men and women (and teenagers) with increased technology and free availability to explicit sexual erotica. Provided the triple XXX pornography on the internet, many adults are increasingly becoming consumed or even addicted to porn.

Some may argue internet pornography is not addictive, however, research has shown the brain chemicals change in the brain relating to watching porn. Many researchers have shown brain images where the brain shrinks some due to the inactivity of using their brains on much except for watching porn. Other researchers indicate this may be temporary and our brains have plenty of plasticity, when the individual quits watching pornography, their brains return to normal.

Regardless whether internet pornography is ‘addictive’ or ‘compulsive’, there are many relationships and marriages in danger due to one partner (usually males) watching pornography and not attending to their partners needs. Some individuals state “watching pornography and masturbating is easier than either getting rejected from my partner or putting in the extra effort.”  The internet makes this easier for many people in relationships where their sex life has taken a back seat to life regardless of the numerous reasons.

Many couples have reported losing the spice or don’t have the energy or time for sexual relations and have resorted ‘giving up trying’ with their partner to internet porn. Partners have reported “it is easier to look at porn for sexual gratification than engage with my partner who may reject me.”  Or, “my partner is tired all the time, complains about the kids taking the energy, not interested, etc.”  Rather than the partner working on their relationship, and putting forth the ‘work’ it may take, they may resort to pornography.

Regardless, of the reasons, many relationships are silently suffering due to the pornography epidemic.  Since internet pornography is easily assessable and majority of sites are free, this makes it even more enticing and hard to reject when their own relationship is not providing the sexual intimacy they desire.  Relationships and marriages are ending due to this epidemic, and many mental health therapists are either not trained properly on how to work with these couples, and/or the couple does not reach out for help.

Although some researchers may argue pornography may enhance a couples sex life, and other researchers will debate the opposite is true.  Bottom line, if one partner is bothered or ready to end the marriage/relationship due to internet pornography, has spoken to their partner about their feelings, and this partner continues to watch or use internet pornography for sexual gratification, then there is a problem.  Many partners have told me “they allowed someone else into our relationship/marriage, and I feel cheated on.”  Yes, internet pornography can be perceived this way.  If you or your partner are struggling with this silent epidemic, reach out to a trained professional to help both of you before ending your marriage/relationship.

Written by Rochelle Long, MA, LMHC

The Family Courts Are Flawed…

The family courts and family legal system are flawed in so many ways. On one hand, who blames the commissioners and judges for handing out life altering judgements in a matter of approximately fifteen minutes after both parties have argued their point? Yet, on the other hand, how can these commissioner and judges make such quick decisions that may change a child’s future without knowing all the details?

High conflict couples that end up in court (which most do) believe this is the place where their story will be heard, the Commissioner/Judge will ‘understand’ their point of view.  The reality of this is the Commissioner/Judge has so many cases to hear in such a little amount of time, and must make a decision with the information provided in front of them.  If both parties have attorneys, the attorneys argue the main points, and the decision is made before the court.  However, there are more cases that go before the Commissioner/Judge where one party has an attorney, and the other party does not have legal representation, and left to navigate through the court system.  Unfortunately, this situation is usually set up for disaster because learning the court system, laws, rules, etc. is confusing to say the least, and this is what attorneys go to school for.  Many parents cannot afford legal counsel, nor do they meet criteria for ‘free’ services.  Therefore, when one party has counsel, and the other party is pro se; the party with representation has an advantage because this party knows the system, and what to say in front of the Commissioner/Judges.  Additionally, just filing the paperwork alone is confusing, and most parents representing themselves do not have all the proper paperwork, not sure how to file properly, or fill out the legal forms correctly.  The disadvantaged party is left to swim through this large ocean, and navigate through endless motions, court hearings, etc. while decisions are being made in court that may adversely affect the children.

Sometimes, the courts will agree to third party professionals (Guardian Ad Litems, Parenting Evaluators, Reunification Therapists, Parent Coordinators, etc.) to investigate the situation, and provide a report to the courts, does not mean this will hold in court, the professional is not qualified for this high conflict case (hopefully not the case), one party (usually the party with counsel) may not agree with the professional, and select another one to ‘buy time,’ and/or this process takes a long time because of the situation.  Parents that are pro se, usually do not have the thousands of dollars these professional services cost, and rely on the other parent to pay for the services rendered.  The ideal is for both parties to pay 50/50 for the professional(s), have equal say on who the professional(s) will be, and be able to keep the professional(s) when the party with counsel wants to ‘fire’ the professional(s) because of their own fears of the outcome.  Once third party professionals are relieved from the case because one party wanted them removed (usually the party with legal representation), the process begins all over again with a new professional, and the children are the ones that suffer.  Parents are too involved in their own emotions; they are unable to see the damage that is being done to their own child(ren).  The courts will most likely defer to the professionals before they a decision is made because the courts agreed to the motion for a third party.

Third party professionals can be a great asset to these high conflict families, especially for the parties that do not have legal representation.  However, when unequal legal representation is present, this may not stop the party with counsel to continue to file frivolous motions, muddy the paths, and confuse the process before the third party professional(s) even begin their work.  The Commissioners/Judges make decisions based on the motions filed, and the end result may make matters worse for the children.

So, what can be done?  This is a loaded question, and there are no easy answers to bring an end for high conflict families abusing the family court system.  What can the Commissioners/Judges do for these high conflict families when one party has the resources for an attorney, and the other party does not have those resources?  How will both parties receive a fair process given the circumstances, and is there a way for family courts to make both parties accountable for how many motions are filed and review how frivolous they are, and review whether these families are abusing the system for their own personal needs?  Are the parties clearly involved in the court system to do what is ‘best for the children’ or a way to ‘get back at’ or show how ‘terrible’ the other parent is?

We must remember, children love their parents – both parents, including their extended family members.  Yes, there are parents that need help, have substance abuse problems, mental health issues (un-treated), neglectful, abusive, etc., however, majority of these high conflict families that end up in litigation are ‘good enough parents’ and the fight is not about the children (as they proclaim), the fight is about defaming the other parent in the ‘eyes of the courts’ and not doing what is in the ‘best interest of the child.’  The party with the legal representation is more likely to ‘win’ the battle over the unrepresented party, but at what cost?  Will the family court system be able to step in, and stop this needless bullying for the sake of the children, or continue to allow the party with money and legal representation to gas light the unrepresented parent where they may potentially lose parenting time, and/or parenting rights?  There has to be a way to help these parents that cannot afford an attorney (and children) to receive equality in the family courts.

Written by Rochelle Long, MA, LMHC

Long Counseling and Evaluation Services, PLLC

Long Counseling News Letter

Welcome to LCES!

Newsletter February 2018

Check out our new Groups!
In this News:

  • Divorce with children Group
  • Mental Sports Coaching
  • Supervised Visits


DIVORCE with children GROUP STARTING…

**Call 425-609-3670 or email albert@longcounseling to schedule a 15-minute intake to see if this group fits your needs, and get signed up!

This Divorce with children group will run for 8 weeks every Thursday evening from 7pm – 8:30pm. This group is for people going through a divorce that have children, and looking for an organized group to help facilitate the stages of grief, what is normal and what is not, child custody and lawyers, how to communicate with the other parent, dating, and how to normalize your ‘new normal!’  Divorce is never easy, however, there are ways to help process your feelings in a safe environment with others going through similar situations.  Moreover, this group not only covers the divorce/separation; it includes information about how to transition your children in a loving and compassionate way.

At the end of 8 weeks, you will have received support, knowledge, steps on what to do next, and feelings of hope!  Begin your next transition in life on a positive note!

This group is reserved for 10 people, so hurry up, this fills up fast!  Sign up now at the low cost of $360.00 for the full 8 weeks ($45 per group). **Some insurances may pay for this – check with your insurance.


Looking to get Mentally Tough?

Beginning a brand new series on mental sports coaching/mental toughness!  This is for athletes (youth and teens) that want to put their Mental Game on, and work on their mental fitness!  Mental Sports Coaching helps athletes face their fears, reduce their performance anxiety, make a comeback from an injury, fear of failure or success, and/or perfection!  This group will focus on achieving their goals, educating about mental fitness, visualization, and so much more. Remember 90% is mental!  This will be a group setting with break out groups. (**Only Ten Spots)!

Included in this series, there will be 3 workshops for parents of these athletes to help guide them through their athletic journey, and provide support!  These workshops will help parents understand the demands, and stress of youth athletes; and the last thing these athletes need is ‘the dreaded drive home.’

This series begins in March…email albert@longcounseling.com or call 425-609-3670 for your free 15 minute consultation to see if this is a good fit, and then sign up!

This series will be held on evenings and weekends. Help prepare your youth athlete for their mental game!  Sign up today – low cost of $300 per athlete (includes parents) all inclusive!

“We do not fail, we either win, or we learn!”

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Supervised Visits:

We offer excellent quality service!

Contact Albert at 425-609-3670 or email albert@longcounseling.com to set up an intake!

Does Reunification Therapy Really Work?


Reunification Therapy (RT) is intended to transition a child or children back into the lives of their estranged parent usually due to a high conflict custody case.  Reunification Therapy (RT) has many challenges, especially when parental alienation is involved.  The Reunification Therapist must be highly trained and qualified in family systems, developmental psychology, high conflict custody and the effects of children and families, and the family court legal system. Reunification Therapists face many challenges working with these families since majority of RT cases are referred by the courts or DSHS, and the child(ren) have been estranged from one parent for an extended period of time. 
Depending on the age of the child(den), the attachment the child(den) had with the now estranged parent, and the overall relationship with the child(ren) prior to the estrangement may determine the success rate of Reunification Therapy.  Traditionally, children are not born to reject or separate prematurely from both parents. Children are born to love both parents, and it is only natural for children to want to spend time with both parents when a divorce or separation occurs. Sure, some children prefer to spend more time at one home (may be due to the strength of the relationship, convenient, in their school district, where their friends are, etc.), however, that usually does not preclude them from wanting to see their non-custodial parent.  However, there are some children that have valid reasons for not wanting to see their non-custodial parent.  Some reasons (not all) may be:

  • 1. Estranged parent may have a drug and/or alcohol problem. 
  • 2. Estranged parent may have prior Domestic Violence and/or abuse toward the other parent and/or children. 
  • Estranged parent may be emotionally abusive and/or neglectful.
  • Sexual abuse. 
  • 3. Estranged parent may not support the child in their extra curricular activities, and not allow them to participate in these (especially older children and teenagers) during ‘their parenting time.’
  • 4. Estranged parent may have a mental health issue that has a negative impact on the parent’s parenting. 

Although a child may have a ‘valid’ reason not to see their estranged parent, they still must see their estranged parent if it is court ordered, UNLESS A PROFESSIONAL deems the estranged parent not suitable for parenting time until they receive the help they need.  Typically, children love their parents, and once the estranged parent receives the help recommended, and had a strong attachment to their estranged parent prior to their ‘issue’, the relationship will most likely resume after some RT sessions. 

The children that struggle the most with seeing their estranged parent are the ones that see their estranged parent as ‘evil’, ‘crazy’, etc. and have no valid reasons to ‘hate’ or ‘reject’ their estranged parent. These estranged parent’s fall within ‘normal parenting’, and have no history of substance abuse issues, mental health problems, abuse; and they have been supportive of the child’s daily life.  These children typically have their own ‘stories’, and they are not usually the ‘real story’, however, this is their story and their reality. In these situations, the children’s reality is re-written (distorted) in their mind usually by what they have been told by the other parent or family members. Another reason a child(ren) may reject a parent is the ‘favored’ parent may make it so difficult when the child(ren) visit their estranged parent by using guilt after seeing this parent, using them as a messenger, or a detective to spy on the other parent. In return, the child(ren) may find it ‘easier’ to stay with the ‘favored’ parent and avoid any backlash when they return from seeing the other parent.  Eventually these children find their own reasons (justification) to avoid seeing their estranged parent, and the ‘favored’ parent validates the child’s reasons.  In return, a vicious cycle occurs, and the once ‘normally attached parent’ becomes an unfit, abusive, crazy parent the child(ren) no longer want to see. 

After the once ‘normal attached parent’ learns their child(ren) no longer will see them, they may seek help through a counselor or court. Or, the ‘favored’ parent may seek a modification to limit or phase out the ‘estranged’ parent because the child(ren) no longer want to see them due to RCW .191 restrictions (which there is no evidence). Regardless of the road taken, eventually a Reunification Therapist may be court ordered to reconcile these families. The RT that is court ordered begins their own evaluation of the family system and what factors caused the estrangement. In return, the question is ‘does Reunification Therapy work?’  There is no easy answer since there are multiple variables to the family equation. However, if the RT is able to rule out the estranged parent doesn’t have any RCW .191 risk factors, the estranged parent historically have been supportive of the child’s activities, and their is evidence of attachment in their early years; the RT can proceed with reconciling the children with the estranged parent. 

Many factors are applied to reconciliation of the family. Some included are:

  1. Length of estrangement.
  2. How far apart the child’s story is to the estranged parent’s story?
  3. Is parental alienation a factor? 
  4. How severe is the parental alienation?
  5. The hostility of the child toward the estranged parent. 
  6. The support network from the ‘favored parent’ and that side of family
  7. Protective Factors vs. Risk Factors
  8. Are the children in Counseling with a trained therapist that understands RT?

Once the RT reviews the factors, they can create a treatment plan to help move the family to reconciliation. Reunification Therapy is challenging, and may take months to years working with these families to help guide them from their distorted history to making new memories with their estranged parent.  Reunification Therapist’s must work with the whole family system, including the ‘favored parent’ and make recommendations either one or both parents may not support. The courts must back up Reunification Therapist’s recommendations or the process may potentially fail. 

In the end, Reunification Therapy may work when the RT is trained and highly qualified. These type of cases ‘should not‘ be referred to Family Therapists with little to no training in RT.  Additionally, Reunification Therapist’s must have a court order that spells out the expectations of RT, and the parameters the RT can work with. It is imperative the RT be allowed to provide recommendations about parenting time, provided the RT is highly qualified and understands the legal and emotional side high conflict custody cases.  Therefore, RT is considered forensic since the legal system is part of the therapeutic process.  Reunification Therapist’s must take their roles seriously, be empathetic, and be assertive in their role. In order to reunify children with their estranged parent, it will take a qualified RT professional to guide the family into a ‘new normal.’  

Written by Rochelle Long, MA, LMHC, Reunification Therapist and RT Trainer

Long Counseling and Evaluation Services, PLLC

Long Counseling Newsletter

LONG COUNSELING AND EVALUATION NEWSLETTER
June 30, 2017

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Is it about the Parents “my time” or the Children’s Time when thinking about Child Custody?
Written By Rochelle Long, MA, LMHC
Too many parents get so wrapped up in “my time” with their children, rather than think about their “children’s time.” Many parents count the days, minutes, seconds to ensure they are receiving their ‘fair’ share of parenting time with their children, rather than focusing on what is ‘best’ for their children. In fact this applies to parents who share children equally and to parents that have more or less time. STOP! Children are not counting the days, hours, minutes, or seconds they are sharing with either parent; they are enjoying quality time with both of their parents. Children love both parents, and regardless of how much they see each parent, children want to feel free to have friends, play sports, be involved with school, church, etc., just be a kid. Children ‘should’ not need to worry whether Parent A is not receiving what parent A feels is their fair share of ‘time.’ In fact children have developmental milestones where friends, extra curricular activities, sports, and other stuff become their priority, and want their parents support and love during these times. Children do not want their parents fighting over ‘time’, or who the better parent is, children want to be kids and explore their options; just as if this were a nuclear family.

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Case Examples:
Johnny is 10 years old and in fourth grade. His parents have been divorced for three years, and fighting in court for the past two years about custody. Johnny loves both his parents, and looks forward to seeing both. His parents have equal shared parenting, however, his mother refuses to allow Johnny to attend his baseball games during ‘her’ residential time because the father is the assistant coach on the team and feels that three practices a week, and one game per week is too much. The mother didn’t outwardly say this to Johnny, she said “Johnny, don’t you want to go swimming with your cousins and play ‘kid stuff’ rather than play in your baseball game?” Johnny is thinking silently that he loves baseball and doesn’t want to miss his game, however, he wants to please his mom, so he tells her, “go swimming.” The mother feels validated that Johnny doesn’t want to play his baseball game or attend practices, and the mother informs the father that during ‘her time’ she will decide what is best for Johnny. The father feels the mother is purposefully keeping Johnny away from sports and other activities that are directly or indirectly related to the father.

Kayleigh (12) and John (7) live with their mother during the week, and their father every other weekend. Both Kayleigh and John play sports, and most recently Kayleigh was selected to play select soccer, which involves many hours of practices, games away, and tournaments. The mother takes both kids to their practices during the week, however, the father has made it clear that this is ‘his time’ and he will not ‘promise’ to take either of them to their sports. In fact he blames the mother for ‘infringing’ on his time and trying to get the kids to ‘dislike him.’ He refuses to partake in the children’s sports, and this has caused both kids, especially Kayleigh a lot of frustration and sadness because she has to sit during the games she does make it to because the coach expects the players to be at practices and games. Kayleigh has lost some friends due to this because they do not understand why she is not at the games, and they feel she is letting the team down. Kayleigh feels she has to chose soccer or spending time with her father. Legally, her father has ‘time’, however, emotionally Kayleigh is resenting her father for this. John is still young, and plays on a recreational team. He prefers to make both parents happy, and focuses more on ‘parents time.’

Tiffany just turned 13. Her parents have been divorced for 10 years, and she lives majority of the time with her father because her mother lives in a different state due to remarriage. Tiffany sees her mother during holidays, breaks, and summers. Tiffany is a social butterfly and has many friends, and wants to spend time with her friends in the summer close to where she lives majority of the time. Tiffany’s mother supports that, however, enforces Tiffany to spend the allotted six weeks in the summer where the mother resides. Although this has worked well in the past, Tiffany is beginning to resent going to her mother’s during the summer, and begins to bargain with her mother about summer break. The mother automatically thinks the father is involved, and starts a modification of the parenting plan and contempt hearing based on what she perceives the fact that the father is withholding their child (Tiffany). However, it has been Tiffany defying to see the mother, and Tiffany trying to talk to her mother about this. The father has been supportive of the relationship between Tiffany and her mother, and has even been a ‘mediator’ a few times.
These are examples of ‘parenting time’ vs. ‘children’s time.’ Recent research indicates most parents will be flexible in their parenting arrangements so their children can partake in activities and events. In fact, most parents are able to put their personal feelings aside, and think about their child’s needs and wants. With technology, parents and children are able to stay in touch via text, FaceTime, Skype, phone calls, Instagram, Facebook, and other social media (depending on age). Older children and teenagers report feeling ‘connected and supported’ by their parents when they are able to attend functions, play sports, and attend friend outings. These older children also report more enjoyment spending family time with each parent because neither parent is claiming ‘my time.’ Younger children usually prefer spending time with their parents, and family members more often; and still want to participate in activities with their parents support.
This is great news for the flexible parents that co-parent and do what they can for their children. What about the group of parents (approximately 20%) that are considered high conflict, and are counting the days, hours, minutes, and seconds? These parents are not flexible, and do not seem to take into account their child’s schedule. Research has shown children from high conflict families suffer the most! Parents, set your feelings aside, and think about your children and their wants and needs. If you are stuck, reach out to a Parenting Coach for assistance. Children grow up so fast, enjoy each moment and allow them to flourish!

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SUPERVISED VISITS: WE OFFER SUPERVISED VISITS FOR PARENTS THAT HAVE BEEN ORDERED BY THE COURTS. WE PROVIDE A CARING ATMOSPHERE WHERE CHILDREN ARE ABLE TO SPEND TIME WITH THEIR PARENT(S). WE TREAT ALL FAMILIES WITH RESPECT AND WANT THEM TO FEEL COMFORTABLE DURING THEIR SUPERVISED RESIDENTIAL TIME. PLESSE CONTACT ALBERT SANCHEZ FOR MORE INFORMATION – ALBERT@LONGCOUNSELING.COM WE DO OFFER SEVEN DAYS A WEEK SERVICE!

**HELP WANTED: WANT TO START YOUR OWN PRIVATE PRACTICE?
Looking for an EXPERIENCED LICENSED MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONAL OR AFFILIATE to join our team. We offer great CAREER opportunities! Please email longcounseling@gmail.com for more information.

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NEW GROUP STARTING – HURRY UP AND SECURE YOUR SPOT:
‘The targeted parent – Learn Thick Skin, and have contact with your children’
This group is ten weeks long and focuses on working with the targeted parent that is either being reunified with their parent or getting ready to be reunified. This group focuses on ways to handle the stress involved during this process, the loss and grief, normalize the feelings (you are not crazy), and make sense out of this madness. There is a 10 person limit to the group – contact Albert at albert@longcounseling.com if you are interested! The cost is $50.00 per group session. Check to see if your insurance will pay!!

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!
Send us your stories and questions. We are hear to help children and families have healthy relationships and help them learn through these difficult times. Children need both parents, and most parents do not mean to harm their children. Let’s keep our children safe from this emotional abuse.

**Please find us on our facebook page longcounseling and visit our website www.longcounseling.com

https://www.facebook.com/Long-Counseling-and-Evaluation-Services-PLLC-236002253110344

Twitter: ##divorcecoach1

*Thank you for visiting our Newletter. Please email us at longcounseling@gmail.com if you do not wish to be on the newsletter list.

 

Reunification Therapy Training Level 1

Sign Up Now for Reunification Therapy Training – this is a specialized training for Master or Doctorate Licensed Therapists that want to add Reunification Therapy to their practice, or continue their education and understanding of Reunification Therapy (RT).  RT is not family systems therapy, it encompasses family systems, attachment, psychopathology, basic understanding of family law, mediation skills, arbitration ability, case management, and best interests of the child.  This training is a Level 1 Training in a three part training series.  PRICE INCREASES May 31st…SIGN UP NOW while you can still receive the training at a low price!  Other professionals in the mental health and legal field may attend this training to gain a better understanding on what Reunification Therapy is, and understand how our family court system is intertwined with the mental health field.  Lawyers, Judges, Commissioners, Arbitrators, Court Personnel, Guardian Ad Litems, Parenting Evaluators, Case Managers, etc. are HIGHLY recommended to attend this very important training!  Ms. Long is a licensed mental health provider that has provided Reunification Therapy to families for the past eleven years, and has trained and supervised several licensed professionals in reunification therapy.  Ms. Long provides this Level 1 training, and will provide Level 2 in the Fall 2017.  Ms. Long also offers companies that want her to train small, medium, and large mental health organizations that prefer ‘in house training’ at a reasonable cost*.

Sign Up Here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/o/long-counseling-and-evaluation-services-13684624486

Once you have signed up, and the date is closer, you will receive your personal link to the RT webinar.

*Please contact Ms. Long’s office manager, Albert Sanchez, at 425-609-3670 if you have further questions or would like Ms. Long to come to your business and provide Reunification Therapy Training.

Long Counseling and Evaluation Services, PLLC thanks everyone for their support and dedication in this field to continue to help families and children.

Long Counseling News Letter

Welcome to LCES!

Newsletter May 2017

Check out our new Groups!
In this News Letter:

  • Reunification Therapy Training
  • Spring into Summer
  • Divorce with children Group
  • Mental Sports Coaching
  • Supervised Visits

Sign up Now for Reunification Therapy Online Training Part 1 of 3 Series:

Early Bird Pricing Available!

https://www.eventbrite.com/o/long-counseling-and-evaluation-services-13684624486

Spring Into Summer – Kids are Home For Summer Vacation!

For most parents, Summer equates to kids are home and what now?  Like most parents, they try to occupy their children’s time with camps, activities, outside adventures, hikes, walks, going on vacation, or to the beach. There are endless options when kids are home for summer vacation.  This is the opportunity to bring closeness to your family by adding a special day, or evening, and enjoying their company without TV, video games, You Tube, etc., and bond by doing an activity that is fun for everyone. Now, if you have teens, they will tell you ‘this is boring’, however, majority of the time once the teenager is on their adventure, they will enjoy it. This does not have to cost anything, and can be creative. Parents that work, share custody with the other parent, or see their child(ren) infrequently can all find ways to connect with their child(ren) by finding a common interest or trying something new.  Take this time to enjoy your child, regardless of age, and have fun adventures. It is not about the quantity of time, it is about the quality!  Look on Pinterest for great ideas!  


DIVORCE with children GROUP STARTING…

**Call 425-609-3670 or email albert@longcounseling to schedule a 15-minute intake to see if this group fits your needs, and get signed up!

This Divorce with children group will run for 8 weeks every Thursday evening from 7pm – 8:30pm. This group is for people going through a divorce that have children, and looking for an organized group to help facilitate the stages of grief, what is normal and what is not, child custody and lawyers, how to communicate with the other parent, dating, and how to normalize your ‘new normal!’  Divorce is never easy, however, there are ways to help process your feelings in a safe environment with others going through similar situations.  Moreover, this group not only covers the divorce/separation; it includes information about how to transition your children in a loving and compassionate way. 

At the end of 8 weeks, you will have received support, knowledge, steps on what to do next, and feelings of hope!  Begin your next transition in life on a positive note!  

This group begins May 24th!  This group is reserved for 10 people, so hurry up, this fills up fast!  Sign up now at the low cost of $360.00 for the full 8 weeks ($45 per group). **Some insurances may pay for this group, check with your insurance. 

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Looking to get Mentally Tough?

Beginning a brand new series on mental sports coaching/mental toughness!  This is for athletes (youth and teens) that want to put their Mental Game on, and work on their mental fitness!  Mental Sports Coaching helps athletes face their fears, reduce their performance anxiety, make a comeback from an injury, fear of failure or success, and/or perfection!  This group will focus on achieving their goals, educating about mental fitness, visualization, and so much more. Remember 90% is mental!  This will be a group setting with break out groups. (**Only Ten Spots)!

Included in this series, there will be 3 workshops for parents of these athletes to help guide them through their athletic journey, and provide support!  These workshops will help parents understand the demands, and stress of youth athletes; and the last thing these athletes need is ‘the dreaded drive home.’

This series begins in June 2017…email albert@longcounseling.com or call 425-609-3670 for your free 15 minute consultation to see if this is a good fit, and then sign up!

This series will be held on evenings and weekends. Help prepare your youth athlete for their mental game!  Sign up today – low cost of $300 per athlete (includes parents) all inclusive!

“We do not fail, we either win, or we learn!”

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Supervised Visits:

We offer excellent quality service!

Contact Albert at 425-609-3670 or email albert@longcounseling.com to set up an intake!

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